Tag Archives: Twitter

And so it begins. Has Vine become the “in” thing?

A few days ago, I posted about Vine, the social video service launched by Twitter on Thursday.

Vine users can create short, six second videos, which can be published to their Twitter, Facebook and/or Vine profiles.

Well it seems that the world has gone Vine mad in the space of a few short days.

Over the weekend, at least two different sites have popped up, built off of the Vine phenomenon.

The first, Vinepeek, is a real time aggregator of Vine videos.

Vinepeek basically broadcasts an endless stream of these six-second Vine videos.

Since all Vine posts are public, viewers can see videos from everyone in the Vine network.

It’s really buggy, and videos frequently freeze, requiring you to reload the page often.

Another service, Justvined.com, lets viewers watch the last 20 videos on Vine.

justvined

The service is very simple, and offers few options beyond watching videos muted or with volume.

This service is buggy too.

If you visit the site from your iPhone, good luck with getting your browser back.

The videos launch automatically, one after the next, in an endless stream of annoyance.

I had to kill Safari to stop the madness.

Despite the limitations of these initial forays, the interweb is literally abuzz with Vine.

Every day new articles pop up about how marketers can use Vine to promote their goods and services, the abuses of Vine (aka Vine porn), and of course, the fallout between Facebook and Twitter over Vine.

Several blogs posts have been devoted to Vine etiquette, the proper way to create Vine videos, and conversely, why Vine signals the end of the world.

But whatever your perspective, Vine has clearly captured the attention of the (media) masses.

Whether Vine will be a flash in the pan or not remains to be seen.

But I suspect that Vine, like Pinterest before it, will develop a massive user community (aka eyeballs) that brands would be remiss to ignore.

One good thing about Vine is that fact this it is a video medium.

And brands can use it more effectively than long form videos, which requires a user sit through the entire thing.

Smart marketers will figure out how to sell folks in six seconds or less.

With the Superbowl coming up, I wonder whether the powers-that-be at Twitter had the foresight to buy up some of that Superbowl ad time.

Outside of the natural buzz they’re getting from the geekorati who are already up on these techie trends, the Superbowl represents an unprecedented opportunity to get Vine in front of the (tech-ignorant) masses.

But I suspect there are already several hundred thousand Vinies? Viners? out there already.

By the way, what is the appropriate verb for making Vine videos? Vining?

I’ll bet you the Crispin Porters of the world are already hard at work coming up with Vine pitches for their brands.

So what do you think?

Is Vine here to stay?

Are you planning to Vine?

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Filed under apps, digital advocacy, iPhone, mobile, technology

Do you Vine? Twitter launches micro-video sharing app

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Have you heard of Vine, Twitter’s latest spinoff?

In a nutshell, it’s a micro-video sharing app that’s currently available for iPhone users.

The app launched yesterday, and it essentially allows Vine users to post short 6 second videos to Vine, Twitter and Facebook.

What’s the big friggin deal, you ask?

Well they’re not any old six second videos.

They work like GIFs letting you create clever stop-animation style videos.

And it’s easy as pie to do.

All you do is turn on your phone’s camera from within the app.

There’s a little camera icon in the header.

Then you hold your finger to the screen.

As long as your finger is touching the screen, Vine records.

Lift you finger, recording stops.

Press the screen again, recording starts again.

Lift it, it stops.

Each time you press the screen, a green progress bar shows you how much recording time you have left.

When you’ve hit your six second limit, a green check box appears on the screen.

Press it and you’re presented with the option to post to the Vine community, Twitter and Facebook.

Toggle the switches to select your preference and viola! You’re done.

Getting set up with Vine is a cinch.

You can register with your Twitter account or sign up via email.

From there, you’re prompted to confirm your profile details.

And then Vine gives you a short live tutorial to show you how to use the app.

In addition to letting you create your own short vids, you can browse through the creative contributions of other users from the ‘Explore’ option in the app.

There’s also an ‘Activity’ option in the menu, which stores all of your activity within the Vine community (likes, shares, comments, etc.).

Posting micro-videos to Vine is the video equivalent of Tweeting.

You’re posting short bursts of content that followers consume like potato chips.

It’s so super easy to use that I can see this thing taking off.

But what do I know?

There’s already a bit of controversy surrounding Vine’s release.

Apparently, unlike most other apps being introduced nowadays, you can’t sign up for Vine with your Facebook account.

And there is some question as to whether you can actually post to Facebook via the app.

When I tried, there appeared to be a glitch in the matrix.

Although I was presented with the standard access screen, the app crashed when I elected to allow the app to post activity to my profile.

Hmmmm…

Anyway, if you’re interested in yet another social sharing app that’s a monumental waste if time, Vine is right up your alley.

From my short time with it, I foresee it being quite addictive.

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Like me and I’ll like you back. Reciprocity, social media style.

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If you’re a member of any of the many groups on Linkedin, you may have seen a thread inviting members to ‘like’ a fellow member’s Facebook page.

In exchange, the owner of the page will like the pages of participating members back.

Similar campaigns have been floated for folks to follow one another on Twitter.

These types of initiatives operate on the honor system, with participants adding their respective Facebook URLs or Twitter handles only after they’ve like fellow participants’ pages.

I’ve participated in a few of these exchanges (purely for investigative purposes).

But I had to stop once I started seeing status updates of dog walkers, podiatrist and various other nondescript entities and individuals I didn’t really know, popping up on my Facebook page and inside my Twitter feeds.

While the idea was good, the end result left much to be desired.

Now you must know that there is a certain etiquette underpinning initiatives such as these in social media.

It’s the principle of reciprocity.

Essentially, the principle of reciprocity dictates that one good turn deserves another.

It started with Twitter.

When I first joined Twitter, they actively promoted reciprocal following.

If someone followed you, the proper protocol was that you followed that person back.

When you only had a few followers, reciprocity seemed like a great idea.

Simply by trolling through Twitter, you could follow a whole bunch of folks and (with the etiquette of reciprocity) have them follow you back.

Great right?

Only theoretically.

But finding and following people on Twitter was a manual, labor intensive process.

You had to find an follow cats one at a time.

Boo hiss! Who has time for all that?

Then services like TweetSpinner came and changed the game.

TweetSpinner (and services like it) allowed you to automate the find-and-follow process, which could only heretofore, be done manually.

Simply plug in a few keywords and search filters, and voila! you had a whole list of like-minded folks, which you could follow, en masse.

Even if only a small fraction of them followed you back, the ratio with which you were identifying and following meant that you could grow your followers exponentially faster than you ever could before.

Soon Twitter found its numbers exploding as users scurried about trying to build larger and larger followings.

Ashton Kucher famously challenged CNN to see who could reach one million followers first.

Ashton won.

Not to be left out in the cold, Facebook also encouraged social reciprocity.

Facebook went from fans to ‘likes’ and soon everywhere you looked, folks were liking each others’ pages (and content within pages).

Someone puts up a picture, video, song or clever statement, what do we do?

Like it, of course.

Get a favorable comment from someone, what do you do in return?

Like their comment, what else?

Liking has become such an important commodity, that brands have been dropping like widgets on everything they produce.

Email newsletters, digital flyers, event pages, you name it.

The concept of liking has become so pervasive, numerous white papers have been devoted to the subject.

Still, many are unsure of the value of ‘like’ currency.

But I believe that it’s a good measure of a brand’s stickiness.

While there may not be a lot of data to support the relationship between Likes and conversion rates, it’s clear that brands that interact with their audience (as defined by the folks who have liked your page) derive some benefit from the exchange.

A trend thats starting to gain traction, is the concept of paying it forward.

#followfriday, retweets, re-pins, shares are all examples of the ways cats are paying it forward online and in social media.

Adding new content and keeping your pages fresh give folks a reason to visit, re-publish your information and like your page.

Now get out there and like somebody!

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Filed under branding, digital advocacy, social media

ReTweet This: Twitter’s Emergency Request Policy Sucks

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When I first heard about Twitter failing to provide police with the information about the user who posted threats about committing mass murder at the opening of Mike Tyson’s play, I thought, “what a bunch of a**holes!

I mean really?

In the wake of the massacre at the opening of Dark Knight in Aurora, I would think that anyone receiving a threat involving a mass killing would be more than willing to comply.

Even more so, if that threat were communicated over a public forum or via social media.

I wouldn’t have imagined that Twitter would have refused to turn over user information to police, especially when that request was made pursuant to Twitter’s so-called “Emergency Request” provision.

Twitter’s Guidelines for Law Enforcement, states, in pertinent part:

Twitter evaluates emergency disclosure requests on a case-by-case basis. If we receive information that gives us a good faith belief that there is an emergency involving the death or serious physical injury to a person, we may provide information necessary to prevent that harm, if we have it.

So you can imagine my dismay to learn that police had (in fact) made their request consistent with Twitter’s policy…and were still denied!

I get it.

No company which has an obligation to protect the privacy of its users, wants to be perceived as failing to maintain those boundaries, by simply bowing to every request from law enforcement.

And I’m sure that there are many less-then-emergent requests they’ve received over time.

But where the content being published is public, and the user voluntarily broadcasts their musings for all to see…

Or worse, when the user intends to cause panic or alarm, then the cost of protecting the privacy of an individual (crazed) user should definitely be outweighed to the benefit of protecting the public from menace.

In this instance, Twitter’s position was that there was nothing particularly specific about the threat.

Nothing specific?

Did dude have to put a time in the Tweet?

I’m going to kill 600 people on Saturday at 1:30 pm CST.

A Twitter spokesperson added that if law enforcement wanted their records, they could obtain a subpoena to obtain them.

And, in fact, that’s precisely what the police did.

Three days after their initial request, Twitter was subpoenaed and turned over the records.

Three days later.

You have an emergency request provision FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT and you felt comfortable denying a request for information about a threatened mass murder by one of your users?

Not that I wish harm on anyone, but how effin’ crazy would Twitter have looked if dude actually followed through on his threat prior to being subpoenaed?

Is that what it takes?

And let’s be real.

Does this guy have any legitimate expectation of privacy, that Twitter should have taken such a stance?

No.

He’s a nut job.

And Twitter is nutty too.

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Filed under opinion, rant, social media

I’ve got no Klout? Gimme a break!

I’m like a gangsta without a gun…I’ve got no Klout!

I just created an account on Klout and was appalled to discover that I had an influence rating of 10.

10!

Mind you, the Klout measures influence on a scale from 1 to 100.

So you can imagine my shock to learn that I had the influence of a kumquat.

In my professional self, I regularly discuss influence as measured by services like PeerIndex, Twitalyzer and Klout, as points of reference for how individuals and entities can assess the impact of their social media.

But I hadn’t thought of the type of influencer I was.

I publish a blog for chrissakes!

True. I haven’t published very regularly since April…

And I’ve completely fallen off the wagon on Facebook…

Can’t recall the last time I pushed a flick up on Flickr either…

But of course I have influence!

I’m registered with virtually every social media platform (of significance) under the sun.

When I signed up with Klout, I registered my Facebook, Google+, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, WordPress and Instagram accounts.

Even though I’ve got a Blogger and Tumblr account, I left those ones out because I rarely use them (but perhaps I’ll go back in an add those too….hmm).

And every so often, folks comment on my blog posts, retweet my tweets, share my Facebook updates, watch my videos and generally seem to respond to my virtual ramblings.

But clearly not enough for Klout to feel that I have real influence!

Damn you Klout!

Now I’m not really smarting about my dismal Klout rating.

Yes I am.

But it does present a compelling case study for how influential one really is online.

Prior to registering with Klout, I had received numerous requests from friends and associates (via Facebook) to join Klout.

To me, it was yet another app fracturing my attention online, that I would have to show some love.

Unless, it’s one of those truly useful apps, that runs in the background, without you having to log in and actually do anything, and actually provides value, I’m sure it will go the way of many of the social media platforms/applications vying for users/user attention, and fall into obsolescence once the sheen wears off.

But who knows, I may find Klout truly useful and have a change of heart.

I doubt it.

The relationship with Klout has already started off a bit too rocky for my taste…

…an influence rating of 10…

Klout you’ve got some m*tha f*ckin’ nerve!

PS If you’re within the sound of my blog, please throw some K’s on a bruh!

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Enough with the Acronyms! Plain English please.

Enough with the jargon. Plain English please!

The other day while giving a presentation, the client asked, “what does RAID mean?

We had been talking about servers, storage and protocols for preserving and backing up data – not roach spray.

And RAID had been introduced because it would continue to function even if one of the drives were damaged or inoperable.

Eventually, we explained that RAID was an acronym, which stood for “redundant array of independent disks.”

It’s a form of storage technology that combines several drives into a single unit, making it robust and reliable (and relatively inexpensive as servers go).

Reflecting on that meeting, I was struck by the frequency with which we tech types use acronyms as if they were common parlance.

The reality is that there is so much alphabet soup out there, that it’s difficult for techies to keep up, much less lay folk.

So today’s class will focus on defining some of these acronyms, and building your technical lexicon.

I’m sure you’re familiar with SMS (short messaging service), MMS (multimedia messaging service), DRM (digital rights management), CPM (cost per thousand impressions), yada yada.

Here are four terms you may not know, but should.

LBSlocation based services.

Tech speak: LBS is an information or entertainment service, accessible with mobile devices through a mobile network which uses information on the geographical position of the device. We are the Borg. You will be assimilated.

The Borg can use LBS to find you.

Plain English: LBS is a system which lets you send and receive information from your mobile phone, based on where you happen to be at the moment. Common uses of LBS include finding the nearest ATM machine (BoA), tracking a package (Fedex) or locating a specific destination (Google Maps).

NFCnear field communication.

Tech speak: NFC is a set of standards for smartphones and similar devices to establish radio communication with each other by touching them together or bringing them into close proximity.

Plain English: NFC is technology that makes life easier and more convenient for people by allow them to make transactions, exchange digital content, and connect to electronic devices with a touch. Common uses of NFC include opening a car with your phone (ZipCar) or exchanging contact information (Bump).

APIapplication programming interface.

Tech speak: API is a source code-based specification intended to be used as an interface by software components to communicate with each other.

Plain English: An API is a way of putting data into and getting data out of a system, without having to manually type that data in yourself. APIs are simple tools developers create to help other developers make the most effective and efficient use of their code. Many mobile apps out today employ APIs which let you register or log in using your Facebook or Twitter credentials.

GUIgraphical user interface.

Tech speak: GUI is a type of user interface that allows users to interact with electronic devices with images rather than text commands.

Plain English: A GUI makes it easier for people to learn, use and implement, through the use of icons, graphics, and menus. Think Apple.

So the next time you hear a techie waxing eloquently in technical jargon, you no longer have to nod your head knowingly (while totally ignorant to what’s actually being said).

You can jump in that convo and throw a few around your damn self!

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Filed under digital advocacy, opinion, technology

When Good Apps Go Bad (aka Bump You’re Obsolete)

Does anyone bump anymore?

Remember Bump?

Bump was the app that let you literally ‘bump’ your iPhone with another user to exchange contact info.

When it first came out, I thought it was the most ingenious app ever!

So, of course, I downloaded the app, and was ready to bump with all comers!

Whenever someone asked me for my contact info, I pulled out my phone and asked if the person wanted to bump.

I would push my phone furtively at them, grunting ‘bump, bump’ incessantly.

Usually, all I got back were quizzical stares.

I guess I was one of the very few who actually got bump, because I wasn’t really bumping with anyone.

Whenever I was in a position to use bump to exchange info, the other person didn’t have Bump.

The few that had it, didn’t know how to use it.

The ones that had it installed, didn’t have their contact set up and thusly, couldn’t bump with me.

After a few (too many) instances of bump fails, I just stopped using it.

It was too frustrating.

How many times would it take for me to realize that Bump just wasn’t that joint?

I don’t think I’ve used it in over a year.

I haven’t been asked by anyone to ‘bump’ in even longer.

But for some reason, I’ve still got it on my deck.

So I opened it up today, to see what (if anything) I’ve been missing

Apparently, you can use Bump to share pictures and music too.

You can connect with Facebook, Twitter or Linkedin now as well.

And there is a messenger function, that lets you message other Bump users remotely.

I did a Google search for Bump recently, and they’ve also got an Android version of the app.

The new Bump logo.

Does anyone even bump anymore?

There are a heck of a lot of ratings in the iTunes store (over 300,000), but are folks really using Bump like that?

I doubt it.

But hey, what do I know?

Do you have an app that you were once ga-ga over, thanthat now, you treat like a hump-backed stepchild and you don’t even look at?

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Filed under apps, iPhone, mobile, opinion, rant

Free Angela and All Political Prisoners! Spread the Word!

A few days ago, the New York Times posted an interview of my client, Shola Lynch about her experiences as a high school and collegiate athlete, and how the competition that sports foster helped her to become a successful individual.

If you don’t know who Shola Lynch is yet, then (1) you clearly haven’t been reading my blog, and (2) you wouldn’t know that she is an award-winning filmmaker working on her second documentary film.

The reason I’m so excited is that Shola actually talked about her film, Free Angela & All Political Prisoners, in the NY Times article!!!

Free Angela is a documentary that chronicles the real-life drama surrounding the manhunt, arrest, trial and eventual acquittal of Angela Davis in 1972.

Love this logo design by Little Grey House!

This year marks the 40th anniversary of the acquittal of this political activist, educator and author, and the film is nearing completion.

You must know that I’ve been actively working on developing Shola’s online, mobile and social media strategy for the film.

We’ve already got a Facebook page, Twitter account and a landing page up for folks to sign up to get more info about the film.

We’re actively working on launching the website and mobile site (and hopefully a mobile app), as well as a promotional mix-tape and soundtrack. I can barely contain my excitement whenever I think about the music – but I digress.

I harass her constantly about letting the world know all the wonderful things that have been happening behind the scenes.

Like the fact that Vernon Reid is composing music for the score, and a few power house filmmakers (whose names I can’t mention yet) have already shown the movie love.

I’m all over her to post updates to Facebook, tweet and generally tell the world about the film.

In all fairness to Shola, she has been editing the movie, and she’s currently in Oakland, where she just shared the movie with Angela.

There is so much great iconic art of Angela out there!

And to her credit, Shola likes to have her hands in everything related to her films (as should any good filmmaker), so I can’t be too hard on her.

And she’s getting better about posting and tweeting, and generally not holding (too many) things too close to the vest.

But now that the cat’s out of the bag, I’m going to be all over her to make sure that we let everyone know that the film is nearly done!

I’ve already sent her an agenda for our next meeting when she get’s back from Oakland.

I’m not even the first blogger to talk about the fact that the cat’s out of the bag.

Indie Wire reported yesterday that the film is almost done, and that they’re looking forward to it too.

With independent films, buzz like this is invaluable.

And using personal networks and social media are essential.

Unlike the big production studios, which have millions of dollars to make and promote films, independent filmmakers have to be much more resourceful (and scrappy) not only to make their films, but to get them before audiences.

More likely than not, you won’t see most independent films on the big screens of AMC or Clearview.

You might catch them in a festival or art house theater, because unfortunately, independent films don’t get the love of their better financed feature-film cousins.

But that doesn’t mean that they don’t do well.

Quite the contrary, an independent film, that leverages the filmmaker’s personal network and the power of social media, can do quite well.

One of Shola’s good friends (and fellow filmmaker) Ava Duvernay is proof positive of this paradigm.

Ava DuVernay is a recent Sundance Film Festival award winner.

Ava is an award-winning filmmaker herself.

Her films have done remarkably well, and her innovative approach to marketing and promoting independent films led to the creation of AFFRM, the African-American Film Festival Releasing Movement, which gives independent black filmmakers access to wider screening.

The beautiful Michaela Angela Davis is part of Shola's sista girl squad.

And Shola’s ‘sista girl’ squad is full of social media heavy hitters, like Michaela Angela Davis and Sidra Smith, who all love Shola, and are ready, willing and able to help her spread the word about her film.

Sidra Smith is another beautiful member of Shola's sista girl squad.

We’re working on quite a few tasty treats to help grow our audience online.

So far, we’ve got about 650 fans on the Facebook page, and (a measly) 79 followers on Twitter but we’re actively growing those numbers.

We’re asking folks to visit both pages and share! share! share!

I’ll be sure to let you know when the trailer is available, and when we launch some of these online campaigns for the film, so stay tuned!

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Nicki Minaj’s Grammy Performance. Can we say train wreck?

I was originally going to write about my recent experience over the weekend with SoundHound, Shazam and Quora, but in light of the veritable explosion last night over the Grammy awards, I had a change of heart.

If you didn’t see the Grammies last night, then you missed (yet another) lackluster awards show.

But if you were patient enough to sit through three hours of the music industry’s self-congratulatory adulation, and LL Cool J’s (awkward and painful) attempt at charm and wit as the night’s host, then you might have witnessed what was undoubtedly the most exceptional event of the evening: Nicki Minaj.

Nicki’s Minaj’s performance of Roman’s Revenge received the WTF!? Award for it’s sheer theatrical lunacy.

Titled “The Exorcism of Roman,” Minaj channeled her demonic alter-ego for a crazed, out-of-pitch, barely intelligible five-minute performance, which ended with her floating mid-air above the stage.

If you didn’t see it, please accept my apologies for posting it here:

The response on the Twitter-sphere was almost unamimous: Nicki Minaj was wilding (and her performance was garbage).

Here are a few choice Tweets.

I'm embarrassed. Nicki Minaj should be too.

Compared to Nicki Minaj, Lady Gaga seems...normal?

Please, please, please...make it stop!

While I’m sure that Nicki Minaj fans will say that this was the greatest Grammy performance ever (they’re drinking the Kool Aid), the rest of us, who don’t have our heads up Nicki’s (allegedly) surgically augmented derrière, would likely beg to differ.

I can say this much, about her performance, Nicki Minaj pulled out all the stops.

To what end?

That remains to be seen.

But if Nicki’s intent was to get people talking…mission accomplished.

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Filed under opinion, rant, Smack talking, social media

What Would Stephen Do? (WWSD): Five Social Media Solutions for Super Bowl XLVII

Not Steve Jobs! Stephen Chukumba! What Would Stephen (Chukumba) Do?!

So I’ve spent the past two days bitchin’ and complaining engaged in thoughtful dialogue about what advertisers did wrong with their Super Bowl commercials, from a social media perspective.

Sure, I was disappointed, but what would I do differently, if any of those brands had hired me or my firm to manage their social media efforts?

So without further ado, What Would Stephen Do (WWSD) to make Super Bowl XLVII commercials more socially engaging?

1.  Seed. If you’re a marketer, you knew that the ads that ran during the Super Bowl were available before the big game. Only a select few knew this. Why? Why not make these commercials available to your active social media audience?

Everyone who has ‘liked’ your Facebook page, followed you on Twitter or belonged to any of your social media networks should have received a private message letting them know that the commercial was going to be available before the game.

They should have been encouraged to give their feedback and share, share, share! In this way, advertisers would have given their loyal followers exclusive, first-look access, and built valuable in-roads with folks who were already interested and advocates of their brands.

For Super Bowl XLVII, I’d make sure that I seeded my audience with snippets, trailers, teasers, sizzle reels, behind-the-scenes, and other exclusive content to prime them for the big show.

2.  Give Explicit Calls To Action. One of the greatest issues I had with the commercials which aired Sunday, was the absolute lack of clear calls to action. What <brand name here> did you want me, the viewer, to do?

Hey Chevy! You and your apocalypse ad. Was I supposed to stock up on Twinkies? I know you want me to buy your cars, but you could tell me to visit your Facebook page, website or something!

I would have explicit calls to action included in all my commercials. I.e. “Text CHEVY to 37619 from your mobile device to schedule a test drive.” Or “‘Like’ Chevy on our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Chevy to learn more abou the new Silverado.” Or “Visit us on YouTube at http://youtu.be/XxFYYP8040A to watch our Silverado Super Bowl ad and share it with your friends!”

3. Rewards & Giveaways. You’ve got to give something to get something. In social media, the law of reciprocity is understood. So if I were advising any of these brands, I would make rewards and giveaways an explicit part of my strategy.

Several brands integrated Shazam into their commercials. If you used Shazam to find out the title and artist of the song in the commercial, I <brand name here> would send you the song as a free download.

Everyone who “liked” my car company on Facebook would be offered a free test drive. “Like” my beverage or snack company and get a coupon for a free sample. Tweet my hashtag, and get a discount when you file your next tax return with my company or register for insurance.

There is no greater way to build brand loyalty, than to give things away. And give sh*t away, we would!

4.   Contests. The NFL was the only brand that understood the inherent value of running a contest. The commercial for the NFL Perfect Fantasy promotion, ran throughout the Super Bowl, was the only contest from any of the brands.

If I were advising a car manufacturer, the contest would have given a way a new vehicle (or a lease for a year). A food, beverage or snack brand, free beverages/snacks for life. Tax brand, free tax preparation. Clothing retailer, free wardrobe. Insurance company, no premium policy.

I could go on and on.

Regardless of the brand, I would incentivize social media participation and sharing with a contest.

5.  Polling. One clear opportunity that was lost to everyone who aired a commercial during the Super Bowl, was the chance to find out what their audiences thought.

Did you like the first quarter? First half? Half-time show? Our commercial? Our product? The Super Bowl? Who do you think is going to win? What do you think the score will be? Who do you think will be the game’s MVP?

Anyone/everyone could have asked probing, insightful, or humorous questions easily.

Aside (one again) from the NFL, which asked people to vote for the MVP of the game, there were absolutely NO POLLS. WTF!

With people sitting captive for over four hours watching the game, WITH THEIR CONNECTED DEVICES (which they were obviously using the entire time!!!) not one brand thought, “Hmmm…maybe we should ask them what they think about our <fill in the name of your innocuous product here>?”

I would ask questions until I was blue (no pun intended, but completely apropos) in the face!

So there!

I’ve said it!

If you had hired me <name of brand that didn’t hire me here>, I would have given you far more run for your money, AND you would have incalculably valuable data THAT YOU COULD IMMEDIATELY ACT UPON to boot.

So next year, make sure I’m on your short list.

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Filed under branding, digital advocacy, rant, Smack talking, social media, technology