Tag Archives: Steve Jobs

I am a Rockstar. You are a Rockstar. A study in self confidence.

Lipperhey_portrait

I regularly find myself giving out sage advice to folks.

Of course my advice is sage, why else would people seek me out I offer it unsolicited?

Anywho, the advice I give ranges widely from person to person.

Sometimes its about technology, sometimes business, sometimes branding.

But usually, its about helping folks to overcome whatever obstacles they face in their path to success – however “success” is defined.

“Stephen, how can I get my boss to give me more money?”

“Stephen, I don’t feel appreciated at my job. What should I do?”

“Stephen, why do I keep getting passed over for promotions?”

“Stephen, can you show me how to get more followers on Twitter?”

“Stephen, what if no one reads my blog?”

I could go on and on, but you get the picture.

And while the individuals and circumstances they find themselves in may change, there is one constant theme: self confidence.

I find that people are often unaware of their self-worth, and as a result constantly look to external sources for validation.

And that, my friends, is what I call “The Mind Fuck.”

The Mind Fuck is when the opinion of others matters more to you than your own (opinion).

You fuck yourself royally, when you’re incapable of achieving a sense of self-worth in the absence of the support of others.

But, it’s not your fault – well not totally your fault.

I’ll tell you why.

Since we were children, we’ve been programmed to seek the approval of others.

It started with our parents.

Oh how they cooed when we spoke our first word, ate solids for the first time, crawled, then walked, made caca on the potty.

Our formative years were spent being trained like puppies to live in civilized society.

Such that today, Like Pavlov’s dog, we still salivate for those doggy biscuits of approval.

With that kind of insidious brainwashing, it’s understandable why we fall into the trap of giving two shits about other people’s opinions.

What are we as humans, if not social creatures?

But that’s the rub.

Because we are all social creatures, we crave that approval, the “likes” and “follows,” shares and retweets, that say, “you are somebody” and (unfortunately) define many of our current social interactions.

And when we don’t get it, for whatever reason, many of us take it as a blow, a slight, a diminishment of who we are.

Why?

That’s easy: we’ve never cultivated our Inner Rockstar.

What’s an “Inner Rockstar”?

The Inner Rockstar is that thing that makes us unique.

It’s that special characteristic that sets us apart from the rest of the world.

It’s that thing that we possess, that defines us.

Maybe you’re a whiz with PowerPoint.

Or can automatically calculate the ROI for every dollar spent by your firm.

Perhaps you’ve revamped your company’s non-existent marketing strategy.

You might be able to whistle the Stars Spangled Banner with your nose.

Yes. Whistling through your nose is awesome.

Your Inner Rockstar is the part of you that is awesome, regardless of who else knows it.

“Okay Stephen, I’m a rockstar to myself.  So what?”

So what?

So everything!

What makes a rockstar a rockstar?

They let everyone know they’re a rockstar.

They may not rock a t-shirt emblazoned with “I Am A Rockstar” on it.

Although they should – it would make them easier to identify.

But they wear their rockstar status openly.

Think about it.

Tony Robbins. Wayne Dyer. Steve Jobs. Corey Booker. Mick Jagger.

What do all these people have in common?

Confidence and swagger.

They way they hold themselves out to the rest of the world.

The presence they command when they walk into a room.

It’s their confidence.

Confidence.

Plain and simple.

Confidence makes you a rockstar.

Don’t believe me? Try this little experiment.

The next time you’re with a group of people, offer up a fact about something obscure.

For example, did you know that Google Glass was actually conceived by the 16th century inventor Hans Lippershey, who created the telescope? He was the first person to conceptualize images projected on (or through) thin panes of glass. Google owes their innovation to Hans.

This is not true.

Hans Lippershey did invent the telescope, but didn’t conceptualize a wearable computer.

But if you present this information with confidence and authority, stating it as fact, 9 out of 10 people will believe you, without pause.

Why?

It is because Hans Lippershey actually developed a Google Glass concept in 1570?

No. It’s because of your delivery.

You sell it and they’ll buy it, hook, line and sinker.

Imagine, now, that you do everything with that same level of confidence.

Especially things that you’re good at.

I’m certain that you’ll start to realize that you’ve got some mojo.

To be clear, being confident and good at something will not necessarily make you a rockstar in the eyes of the public at large.

But if you can manage to convince yourself that you’re a rockstar, you’re one step closer to convincing others of the same thing.

Now get out there and rock out!

Advertisements

3 Comments

Filed under branding

Despite the slight, I shall still cover Apple’s March 7 press announcement.

Yeah. We're talking to YOU, Stephen Chukumba. You're not invited to our press release. Get it? Got it? Good!

Last week, Apple sent out press invitations for members of the press corps to attend their March 7th press announcement.

I know my seven loyal readers will be shocked when they hear this, but brace yourselves…here goes…

I didn’t get an invitation.

I know, I know.

How could this happen?

I don’t know.

I’ve been asking myself that very question, and I’m still drawing a blank.

I mean, I waited patiently by my mailbox for days.

No invitation.

I thought that perhaps it was delivered to the wrong address.

So I knocked on my neighbors’ doors asking if they had inadvertently received anything with a 1 Infinite Loop, Cupertino, California return address.

Nothing.

Then I thought, they may have sent my invitation in another format.

Was it sent by email?

Nope.

Perhaps it was buried in the spam folder?

Nyet.

Did they send a carrier pigeon?

Nada.

Was Apple trying to reach me via smoke signal?

No Kimosabe.

I’m at a complete loss.

I find it unacceptable that someone of MY stature (with at least eleven readers – that I know of) has yet to receive an invitation.

But you know what?

It’s okay.

Ever since Steve passed, things have been in a bit of disarray.

While I won’t be able to transmit the highs and lows of Apple’s highly anticipated announcements live and direct, I will still provide some (time-delayed) insight to the goings-ons over there tomorrow.

To be honest, I’m really only interested in the announcement as it relates to the iPad 3.

What features are real?

Which are hype?

What will it look like?

When will it actually drop?

Enough with the rumors!

No more supposition!

The people want the truth!

I want the truth!

We’ll forgive Apple’s faux pas, this time.

But next time, I don’t know if I can be so forgiving.

Apple press corps people, listen up!

The next time there’s a press announcement…I want an invitation!

My fifteen readers will be forever grateful!

Please?

1 Comment

Filed under iPad, opinion, rant, Smack talking, technology

What Would Stephen Do? (WWSD): Five Social Media Solutions for Super Bowl XLVII

Not Steve Jobs! Stephen Chukumba! What Would Stephen (Chukumba) Do?!

So I’ve spent the past two days bitchin’ and complaining engaged in thoughtful dialogue about what advertisers did wrong with their Super Bowl commercials, from a social media perspective.

Sure, I was disappointed, but what would I do differently, if any of those brands had hired me or my firm to manage their social media efforts?

So without further ado, What Would Stephen Do (WWSD) to make Super Bowl XLVII commercials more socially engaging?

1.  Seed. If you’re a marketer, you knew that the ads that ran during the Super Bowl were available before the big game. Only a select few knew this. Why? Why not make these commercials available to your active social media audience?

Everyone who has ‘liked’ your Facebook page, followed you on Twitter or belonged to any of your social media networks should have received a private message letting them know that the commercial was going to be available before the game.

They should have been encouraged to give their feedback and share, share, share! In this way, advertisers would have given their loyal followers exclusive, first-look access, and built valuable in-roads with folks who were already interested and advocates of their brands.

For Super Bowl XLVII, I’d make sure that I seeded my audience with snippets, trailers, teasers, sizzle reels, behind-the-scenes, and other exclusive content to prime them for the big show.

2.  Give Explicit Calls To Action. One of the greatest issues I had with the commercials which aired Sunday, was the absolute lack of clear calls to action. What <brand name here> did you want me, the viewer, to do?

Hey Chevy! You and your apocalypse ad. Was I supposed to stock up on Twinkies? I know you want me to buy your cars, but you could tell me to visit your Facebook page, website or something!

I would have explicit calls to action included in all my commercials. I.e. “Text CHEVY to 37619 from your mobile device to schedule a test drive.” Or “‘Like’ Chevy on our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/Chevy to learn more abou the new Silverado.” Or “Visit us on YouTube at http://youtu.be/XxFYYP8040A to watch our Silverado Super Bowl ad and share it with your friends!”

3. Rewards & Giveaways. You’ve got to give something to get something. In social media, the law of reciprocity is understood. So if I were advising any of these brands, I would make rewards and giveaways an explicit part of my strategy.

Several brands integrated Shazam into their commercials. If you used Shazam to find out the title and artist of the song in the commercial, I <brand name here> would send you the song as a free download.

Everyone who “liked” my car company on Facebook would be offered a free test drive. “Like” my beverage or snack company and get a coupon for a free sample. Tweet my hashtag, and get a discount when you file your next tax return with my company or register for insurance.

There is no greater way to build brand loyalty, than to give things away. And give sh*t away, we would!

4.   Contests. The NFL was the only brand that understood the inherent value of running a contest. The commercial for the NFL Perfect Fantasy promotion, ran throughout the Super Bowl, was the only contest from any of the brands.

If I were advising a car manufacturer, the contest would have given a way a new vehicle (or a lease for a year). A food, beverage or snack brand, free beverages/snacks for life. Tax brand, free tax preparation. Clothing retailer, free wardrobe. Insurance company, no premium policy.

I could go on and on.

Regardless of the brand, I would incentivize social media participation and sharing with a contest.

5.  Polling. One clear opportunity that was lost to everyone who aired a commercial during the Super Bowl, was the chance to find out what their audiences thought.

Did you like the first quarter? First half? Half-time show? Our commercial? Our product? The Super Bowl? Who do you think is going to win? What do you think the score will be? Who do you think will be the game’s MVP?

Anyone/everyone could have asked probing, insightful, or humorous questions easily.

Aside (one again) from the NFL, which asked people to vote for the MVP of the game, there were absolutely NO POLLS. WTF!

With people sitting captive for over four hours watching the game, WITH THEIR CONNECTED DEVICES (which they were obviously using the entire time!!!) not one brand thought, “Hmmm…maybe we should ask them what they think about our <fill in the name of your innocuous product here>?”

I would ask questions until I was blue (no pun intended, but completely apropos) in the face!

So there!

I’ve said it!

If you had hired me <name of brand that didn’t hire me here>, I would have given you far more run for your money, AND you would have incalculably valuable data THAT YOU COULD IMMEDIATELY ACT UPON to boot.

So next year, make sure I’m on your short list.

Leave a comment

Filed under branding, digital advocacy, rant, Smack talking, social media, technology